Recent Visual Arts MFA Grads APPLY NOW FOR STUDIO SPACE IN THE BCA’S ARTISTS STUDIO BUILDING. APPLICATION DEADLINE AUGUST 6, 2014.

The BCA is now accepting applications for recent Visual Arts MFA graduates to rent studio space in the Artists Studio Building at the BCA.

PROGRAM OVERVIEW: The Boston Center for the Arts (BCA) is extending a great opportunity for recent MFA graduate students to join the artistically established members of our Artists Studio Building (ASB). Two artist studios (one single occupancy and one optional double occupancy) are available for a term of 2 years, at a very competitive market value, as of September 2014. This offers recent graduates space to develop their practice while working in a community of active studio artists in diverse fields. Participants also have access to Mills Gallery programming, Boston area open studio events, professional development, international artists and art professionals.

See further information, submission guidelines and application

 

About the Artist Studios

The Artist Studios at the Boston Center for the Arts are dedicated to providing affordable workspace and a supportive environment to artists in all disciplines, and at all stages of artistic development. Artists working in studios at the BCA include painters, printmakers, sculptors, filmmakers, craftspeople, writers, performing artists and other art-related organizations.

The building includes fifty work-only studios for artists and arts organizations (studios are not live-in spaces). Studio sizes range from 110 sq ft to 1500 sq ft.

Artists and arts organizations are selected and placed in studios at the BCA through an application and jury-­review process as studios become available.

If you would like more information on the Artist Studios or are interested in applying for a studio, please refer to the application instructions.



Kathleen A. Kneeland PDF Print E-mail

Studio 411
At the BCA since 1999
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kneeland cranes for japankneeland freefallkneeland kill 1kneeland pigeonholed

Artist Statement:

In the seventh grade I learned everything was made of molecules. The idea of a cosmos quivering with an invisible, vital force fascinated me. This notion of all things being somehow connected changed my perception of the world around me and continues to influence and inform my creative process and art.

My work considers the natural world, its various organisms, and the issues that affect them. I am interested in ubiquitous vulnerabilities, strengths, and contradictions that create connections. Inspired by biology, politics, and memory I collect my raw material from a variety of sources: some planned, others by chance.

For the last several years, I have primarily been a painter that likes to draw. Graphite speaks to me. I like its versatile spectrum of possibility, its simplicity. Occasionally, I combine graphite with gesso, paint, or other materials to create layers of images that float in and out of view. Alongside this process lurks a collector that accumulates and assembles strange stuff-- more times than not harvested from the sidewalks and streets. Hovering somewhere between 2 and 3 dimensional work, I create off the wall sculptures that often recycle found objects by combining them with unlikely elements.

My aim is to contemplate systems of existence and their occasional dissolution, to present work that considers what it means to be an integral part of the universe, and the importance of these interrelations.

 

Images:
Cranes for Japan, 2011, mixed media on masonite, 12" x 12"
Freefall, 2009, mixed media on paper, 40" x 38.5"
Kill #1, 2012, graphite, gesso on paper, 24" x 22"
Pigeonholed, 2011, mixed media, 22" x 19.5"

 
Douglas Kornfeld PDF Print E-mail

Studio 305
Artist website

douglas ozymandias decordova sculpture parkdouglas runner indiana state universitydouglas reach boston madouglas meeting of minds denver co

Artist statement:

Public Art is a message in a bottle. In one hundred years the works we commission today will be what informs our children about who we were and what we wanted as our legacy. Great Public Art is timeless. It speaks to us now but will still be relevant to those who experience it in the future. The purpose of Public Art is NOT to decorate a building or site – that is the role of an architect or designer. Design is a creative, functional solution to a practical, definitive problem. Public Art is not practical and rarely functional. Public Art must inspire and transport us beyond our immediate needs. An artwork must challenge us with questions not soothe us with simple answers. Public art must be more than mere decorative embellishment, it must have poetry.

Images:

Title: "Ozymandias" Date: 2009, DeCordova Museum and Sculpture Park, Lincoln, MA, Budget: $20,000 Dimensions: 20' x 18' x 1'-6", Medium: Laminated wood and steel.This iconic male symbol that appears to be sinking into the ground was inspired from images of half buried Egyptian monuments made during the 19th century and the poem by Shelly. "…My name is Ozymandias, king of kings: Look on my works, ye Mighty, and despair!" Nothing beside remains: round the decay Of that colossal wreck, boundless and bare, The lone and level sands stretch far away…." This work was commissioned for the grounds of the DeCordova Sculpture Park and Museum in Lincoln, MA.

Title: "Runner" Date: 2009, Indiana State University Recreation Center, Terre Haute, IN, Budget: $62,000 Dimensions: 23' x 18' x 20"  Medium: Stainless steel. The dynamically posed monumental runner symbolizes the athletic activities taking place in the building. At night a custom light source projects shadows of students walking to and from the building. The diversity of the student's shadows contrasts the generic figure highlighting the unique quality of each participant.

Title: "Reach" Date: 2011, Mozart Park, Boston, MA, Budget: $70,000 Dimensions: 25' x 6' x 5' (not including base) Medium: engraved stainless steel. Commissioned by: New England Foundation for the Arts. From the central axis of the park the five uprights coalesce into the form of an up-reaching arm. From other views the sculpture appears to be an abstraction. Each upright symbolizes the life of an immigrant to the US. Engraved on each are quotations about life as an immigrant from immigrant youth of the neighborhood. The welded joints are purposely left unfinished to symbolize the different moments, twists, and turns in the life of an immigrant.

Title: "Meeting of Minds" Date: 2004, City Park, Denver, CO, Budget: $52,000, Dimensions: 16' x 29' x18' Medium: Steel and perforated steel. Commissioning Agency: Denver Office of Cultural Affairs. This sculpture was commissioned for Denver’s first public golf course to admit African Americans. It symbolizes how thinking about individual differences has changed over time. The dominant object is a monumental African American profile rendered in perforated steel. It won a national award from Americans for the Arts, which recognized the sculpture as “one of the most exciting, compelling, and innovative public art projects completed between April 2004 and April 2005 in the United States.”

 
M.E. Hirsh PDF Print E-mail

Studio 312
At the BCA since 1993
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hirsh kabul

Artist Statement:

My novels Kabul (2002) and Dreaming Back (1996) have been published by St. Martin’s Press and in foreign language editions. Forthcoming is The Holly King, A Novel of Seduction. In 2001, I was awarded a Fellowship in Fiction by the Boston Cultural Council. I’ve written articles and book reviews for the Washington Post, the Boston Globe, the Los Angeles Times and other publications on subjects ranging from Afghanistan to Native American affairs. As a consultant to artists and arts organizations, I craft website content, grant and residency proposals, and artist statements. I share Studio 312 with my husband, poet/composer David Montenegro.

 
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